Tag Archives: construction

San Jose Earthquakes stadium delayed until 2015

The Major League Soccer San Jose Earthquakes suffered another setback today with their new stadium construction that will push back the opening one year.

The Earthquakes had hoped to move to their new 18,000-seat stadium for the 2014 season. As I’ve written before, the Earthquakes’ snakebitten construction project hit delays in July when workers uncovered large concrete bunkers during demolition. Now the team has cited unexpected complexities in connecting the stadium to San Jose’s sewer system.  This team cannot catch a break.

I expect the Quakes will continue to play in their current home, Buck Shaw Stadium, as they await progress on their stadium. Not great news for a team that continues to slip down the table in the Western Conference. Happy Friday the 13th Earthquakes fans.

Poll: What West Coast stadium do you look forward to the most?

There’s no shortage of stadium and arena construction projects underway or in design along the West Coast.  Which project excites you the most?  Vote!

Husky Stadium renovation nears completion

On September 7 one of college football’s loudest and most picturesque stadiums will re-open after a two-year, $260 million renovation project. The University of Washington Huskies Stadium host the Boise State Broncos at the updated Husky Stadium, giving fans a chance to renew their love affair with the beautiful stadium on Lake Washington.

Artistic rendition of the University of Washington's new Husky Stadium

Artistic rendition of the University of Washington’s new Husky Stadium

Under construction since 2011, the new stadium capacity is slightly smaller, dropping 600 seats from 72,500 to 71,900. Perhaps the most significant change to Husky Stadium was the removal of the running track surround the field. Similar to renovations at the Los Angeles Coliseum and Stanford Stadium, Husky Stadium was the only remaining Pac-12 stadium with a running track and its removal lowers the bowl four feet and bring fans closer the field.

The iconic cantilever roofs built to protect fans from typically rainy conditions on north and south sidelines have been retained, which is unwelcome news to visiting teams. Husky fans have created an ear-piercing home field advantage using these roofs and fans in the “Dawg Pound” are eager to continue the tradition in their new home.

Spacious new concourses surround the stadium and a new football operations building including new locker, weight and team meeting rooms await the team and coaches in the revamped west end zone. The south end zone’s former temporary-looking aluminum bench bleacher seats are replaced by permanent seating to create a bowl.

The cantilever roof was removed during stadium demolition, but an updated roof was installed.

The cantilever roof was removed during stadium demolition, but an updated roof was installed.

During the 2012 season when Husky Stadium was renovated, the team played a Qwest Field, home of the NFL Seattle Seahawks. Kansas City-based stadium architect firm 360 Architects designed the new look Husky Stadium.

To check out what the finished product is expected to look like, take the virtual stadium tour  or visit the stadium construction web cam to see the latest action at the stie.

Houston Cougars Stadium Under Construction

Illustration of the University of Houston's new stadium opening for the 2014 season

Illustration of the University of Houston’s new stadium opening for the 2014 season

According to the University of Houston Football Stadium web site’s countdown clock, Cougar fans have only 429 more days until their new stadium opens. That may seem like an eternity to some, but Cougar fans are content to wait this one out knowing what’s to come.

Built upon the site of their previous home, Robertson Stadium, the new 40,000-seat stadium with turf field is slated to open prior to the 2014 season. With over 5,000 club and suite seats, the new stadium features four open-air party decks to provide unique areas for Cougar fans to get their drink on.

I’m not a huge fan of field turf, but I understand the need to have a durable field for multipurpose use for universities to help recoup construction costs. I’m sure you won’t hear the football team complain about the turf as a fast track will help their historically passing-oriented offense.

The latest construction reports suggest they’ll raise the first steel this week.  To see the latest action at the site, follow the progress on the UH Stadium web cam.

Nighttime view of the new Houston Cougars Stadium

Nighttime view of the Cougar Stadium construction

Robertson Stadium met the wrecking ball in December 2012

Robertson Stadium met the wrecking ball in December 2012